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UX Designer

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Localizing & Internationalizing

As the only designer who had created right-to-left (R2L) designs before, I was the natural choice to lead an Israel localization project. The resulting site met its $15M revenue goal with over 80% user satisfaction rates and high-profile merchant sign-ups.

* The Hebrew is taken from Google Translate. Corrections welcome! 

Hewbrew right-to-left address entry.

Designing R2L layouts

For most people, getting their head around right-to-left layouts is a struggle. Once you've got the hang of it, it's easy. Until then feels like it's going to break your brain. 


So I wasn't surprised when my team mates had problems at first. I had followed standard operating procedure for localizing sites - showing wireframes in English and the localized language side by side.

English left-to-right address entry.
English right-to-left address entry.

I knew I was onto something when I saw developers draw English R2L wireframes on the whiteboard. With this new tool, they were able to get over the hump in the learning curve and become fluent in right-to-left layouts. 

To help my team mates, I created a third wireframe. It's a R2L layout but with English labels. 

Animated wireframe for address entry in English and Hebrew.

Here's an animated version